“To see the world, things dangerous to come to, to see behind walls, draw closer, to find each other and to feel. That is the purpose of life.”
-from The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (2013)

Last December I started a tradition of watching a movie by myself once I got home from the last day of classes, before the kids came home. A scene from The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (the newer one) had come to mind in a random moment, so I figured that would be a good selection, since this has been a particularly difficult semester –one in which I’ve asked myself on more than one (or twenty) occasions, “why am I doing this again?” Several classes which don’t seem to have much to do with what I want to do at the end of this educational adventure were getting me a bit draggy at the heels. And in light of the fact that last year was sort of unabated amazingness, well, the contrast was less than helpful.

And, so, I figured a little cinematic existentialism couldn’t hurt.

…But that quote –I really, really want that to be true, but I know it’s not. Because living that way tends to lend itself to losing appreciation for the moments when there are no walls to see behind, no dangerous things, seeing the familiar world. And if I lose that, I know I lose the real purpose of life.

It’s losing the ability to fight to find the beauty in the ordinary, joy in the mundane, that leads to what Thoreau might call “leading a life of quiet desperation.”

The end of Dead Poets’ Society (last December’s semester-end choice) shows the futility of living life in endless pursuit of the mountaintop moments, driven by self-determined goals of what we want our lives to be about.

I remember being pretty disappointed with Walden, when I finally got around to reading it. Thoreau struck me as being sort of self-absorbed, rather anti-social. I’d hoped for a manual on living a richer life, I suppose. I didn’t get that. I got the ruminations of one man who threw out society’s ideals and went off by himself and pretty much gave up on his community. I was left with a feeling of emptiness –a lot like I was at the end of Dead Poets’.

I guess the thing I appreciated about Walter Mitty was not so much the journey of finding courage, but the end: the point where he discovers that everything he needed was right in front of him. The wallet in the trash. The gift he’d ignored. It was all in his back pocket, and he’d gone and thrown it away. He’d made a false dichotomy between safety and adventure, and in the process, sort of missed them both.

Sure, jumping off a helicopter was a thrill, long boarding through Greenland (or was it Iceland? I can’t remember) was pretty incredible.

The journey may change you, but sooner or later, you’ve got to go home.

And that’s where I find myself, months from graduation –about on my journey back home, back to the world of work and writing things maybe nobody will read. Maybe this semester was about fishing through the trash to find that wallet. Learning again to fight for the joy in the mundane. Needing to look harder to find the beauty in the things I live with every day.

“Beautiful things don’t ask for attention” -from The Secret Life of Walter Mitty

What’s the purpose of life? To glorify God and enjoy Him forever. Forever includes the days circled in red on the calendar and the days in between. It includes the unforgettable moments and hours of tedium. It’s all part of forever.

The art of it is to realize that joy is worth the fight.

One thought on “putting to rout all that is not life

  1. Well done. I enjoyed Mitty for many things, but you drew out even more gold for me. And yes, this question of finding the transcendent in the earthly has been, for me, the essence of my faith journey. It is the true message of the Incarnation.

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